Numbers in Spanish: It’s Easy as 1, 2, 3​

Numbers in Spanish
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When learning Spanish, we all come to the point where we have to face the number monster… and no one can hide from it! Before suffocating under the huge mountain of numbers, we need to finally face it and memorize the Numbers in Spanish.

The Spanish numbers might seem long and complicated at first but once you get the hang of it, they are really not that difficult. This is the guide on how to effortlessly memorize numbers in Spanish and defeat the number monster  once and for all.

With our “24 Level System to Spanish Fluency”,  you’ll finish the B2 level after 24 sub-levels. You are currently at Level A1 (sub-levels 1-3), studying the Spanish numbers!

Spanish Numbers: 0 - 10

Level 1 (A1.1)

Let’s start with the basic numbers in Spanish by watching this video:

Impossible not to sing along, right? And guess what… Rosita just taught you the Spanish numbers from 1 to 10 in under a minute!

Let’s recap the basic numbers – memorize them well, because they are the basis for all other numbers in Spanish you will learn.

Number Spanish
0

       cero

1
       uno
2
       dos
3
       tres
4
       cuatro
5
       cinco
6
       seis
7
       siete
8
       ocho
9
       nueve
10
       diez

Cardinal vs. ordinal Spanish numbers​

Level 2 (A1.2)

In Spanish, as well as in English, we distinguish between ordinal and cardinal numbers.

Cardinals are numbers that serve as representatives of a certain size or quantities of something. They can also be used to express time, age, date or weight (1, 2, 3,…).

Ordinals express the order in a sequence of something and can be used to arrange a structure of a speech or presentation (1st, 2nd, 3rd,…).

In everyday Spanish-speaking life, only the ordinal numbers from 1 to 10 are actually used. You probably won’t ever hear a native speaker say ” el vigésimo primer siglo” (the twenty-first century). Instead, they would say “el siglo veintiuno” (the century twenty-one). Ordinal numbers greater than 10 are thus said as cardinal numbers, which is why we will not learn them here. We focus only on the important ordinal numbers from 1 to 10:

Number Spanish
1st
       primero
2nd
       segundo
3rd
       tercero
4th
       cuarto
5th
       quinto
6th
       sexto
7th
       séptimo
8th
       octavo
9th
       noveno
10th
       décimo

It is very important to know that Spanish ordinal numbers are consistent in gender and number with the noun they accompany. 

Example:

La segunda pizza.
“Pizza” is a female noun, therefore the ordinal number ends in –a.

pizza
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Su segundo coche.
“Coche” is a masculine noun, therefore the ordinal number ends in –o.

car
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iOjo! “primero” and “tercero” transform into “primer” and “tercer” when used before a masculine noun.

Example:
El primer beso / El tercer beso → El segundo beso

The Decades - Spanish Numbers: 10 - 100

Level 2 (A1.2)

Every set of 10 numbers are what we call the “decades”.
Remember these numbers very well, because later they will help you to form and combine the larger numbers.

Number Spanish
10
       diez
20
       veinte
30
       treinta
40
       cuarenta
50
       cincuenta
60
       sesenta
70
       setenta
80
       ochenta
90
       noventa
100
       cien

Spanish Numbers: 11 - 15

There is no hack on how to learn the Spanish numbers between 11 and 15 easily. You just have to sit down and memorize them by heart, because unlike the rest of the numbers in the system, these are not based on the single-digit numbers you’ve learned until now (remember Rosita’s song).

iOjo! The Spanish numbers between 11 and 15 all end with the suffix -ce:

Number Spanish
11
       once
12
       doce
13
       trece
14
       catorce
15
       quince

Spanish Numbers: 16 - 19

The Spanish numbers from sixteen to nineteen simply combine “dieci” with the single-digit numbers.

This looks as follows:

Number Spanish
16
       dieciséis
17
       diecisiete
18
       dieciocho
19
       diecinueve

Spanish Numbers: 20 - 29

You may have noticed that there’s a system behind the numbers by now.
Just like before, take the decade and add the single-digit number. 

But there is one thing you need to remember – Spanish numbers until 29 are written in one word, without any spaces!

iOjo! Vowel change! “Veinte” turns into “veintiafter 20.

Number Spanish
20
       veinte
21
       veintiuno
22
       veintidós
23
       veintitrés
24
       veinticuatro
25
       veinticinco
26
       veintiséis
27
       veintisiete
28
       veintiocho
29
       veintinueve

iOjo!  The numbers 16, 22, 23 and 26 have accents!

Spanish Numbers: 30 - 99

Remember how I said that you should really remember the single-digit numbers in Spanish and the decades? If you followed my lead and you know them well, all you need to do is combine them.

Notice that all the numbers bigger than 30 are written as three separate words divided by “y”!

From now on we will follow this simple, consistent system with the following formula:

decade + y + single digit number

Number Spanish
30
       treinta
31
       treinta y uno
32
       treinta y dos
33
       treinta y trés
34
       treinta y cuatro
35
       treinta y cinco
36
       treinta y seis
37
       treinta y siete
38
       treinta y ocho
39
       treinta y nueve
40
       cuarenta
41
       cuarenta y uno
...
...
50
       cincuenta
51
       cincuenta y uno
...
...
60
       sesenta
61
       sesenta y uno
...
...
70
       setenta
71
       setenta y uno
...
...
80
       ochenta
81
       ochenta y uno
...
...
90
       noventa
91
       noventa y uno
...
...
99
       noventa y nueve

Last Step: the BIG Spanish Numbers

If you have followed all this carefully, you have probably noticed that it’s really not that difficult to form the Spanish numbers.

Spanish Numbers: 100 - 999

Level 3 (A1.3)

Good job! But we’re not done yet… let’s turn our attention to slightly larger numbers. Let me introduce you to the Spanish numbers between 100 and 999.

To build the hundreds, we simply extend our formula:

hundreds decade + y +

single digit number

You might see that both, “cien” and “ciento” mean “one hundred” … same same but different?! If both have the same meaning, why are there two different words for the same number and what’s the difference between the two?

To put it in a nutshell, cien” is only used to refer to the actual number 100, nothing else! In all other cases and every Spanish number between 101 and 199,  “ciento” is used.

For Spanish numbers above 199, simply put the single-digit number before “ciento and adds” to the end. Then proceed with the same principle as before.

Number Spanish
100
cien
101
ciento uno
102
ciento dos
103
ciento tres
...
...
147
ciento cuarenta y siete
...
...
199
ciento noventa y nueve

For Spanish numbers above 199, simply put the single-digit number before “ciento and adds” to the end. Then proceed with the same principle as before.

Number Spanish
100
       cien
200
       doscientos
300
       trescientos
400
       cuatrocientos
500
       cincocientos
600
       seiscientos
700
       setecientos
800
       ochocientos
900
       novecientos

iOjo! Note the change of spelling in the case of 500, 700 and 900:

Spanish Numbers Spelling
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Spanish Numbers: 1.000 - 1.000.000

Level 3 (A1.3)

Now’s the time to test if you’ve been paying attention around here. The big numbers in Spanish are long! But the system of how they are formed is exactly the same one we have been using until now.

Here a small overview of the bases of the big, big Spanish numbers:

Number Spanish
1.000
mil
2.000
dos mil
3.000
tres mil
4.000
cuatro mil
5.000
cinco mil
6.000
seis mil
7.000
siete mil
8.000
ocho mil
9.000
nueve mil
10.000
diez mil
100.000
cien mil
1.000.000
un millón

To help you understand the whole thing a little bit better, you can see our formula for the big, big numbers here:

(single digit number/decade/hundreds)

+ mil hundredsdecade + y single digit number

The formula looks long, but you just have to keep on doing what you have done so far

Let’s try to build the number 3.468 in Spanish.
This number consists of thousands, hundreds, tens and single-digits:

3000 – 400 – 60 – 8

And that’s exactly what you say:
tres mil cuatrocientos sesenta y ocho

Next, try build the number 12.777 in Spanish

12 x 1000 – 700 – 70 – 7
doce mil setecientos setenta y siete

And we add another digit: 482.796

482 x 1000 – 700 – 90 – 6
cuatrocientos ochenta y dos mil setecientos setenta y siete

iOjo! Mildoes not adapt to gender or number. No matter which word you put it in front of, it always remains unchanged. The plural of “millón” is “millones

You can practice more numbers in Spanish of the with the help of our resource sheets (A1.1 – A1.3), which include lots of useful online exercises.

If you have followed all the steps attentively, you should now understand how to build the numbers in Spanish and you can give yourself a good pat on the back  – you’ve done it! Now, it is very important that you practice the numbers and repeat them over and over again.

It’s your turn… we now set you free into the wild world of Spanish numbers. From now on, you have to try to apply what you have just learned to finally beat the number monster. But of course, you can always come back here to look for help!

… And now that you have mastered the numbers in Spanish, why don’t you check out the Spanish alphabet

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Numbers in Spanish
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